It’s Important to Our Economy That We Build Things Only Rich People Can Afford

Socio-economic disparity, in my opinion, is real. Wealth is being driven by technology, and technology has made it easier for people to scale, to produce more work, and to achieve more very quickly.

The smartest and most able act smarter and more able because of their smart phones and because of the computers around them that assist in their labor.

And since there are more ultra rich people, we have an opportunity to make ultra expensive and cool things only those people can afford.

In the past, a plane, or a computer, or a car were the types of things only very, very rich people could afford. And the wealth generated off those early customers drove innovation to bring the cost of production down on those expensive toys.

And then those expensive toys became less expensive, and soon were being called innovative. And then they ended up changing how all of us lived, and made it possible for all of us to do ultra cool things that previously only the ultra wealthy could do.

If we build mediocre things that are made for everyone at the very beginning, we’ll never take great leaps forward. Space travel will only be for the ultra wealthy, and for now is a toy of the ultra wealthy, and will continue to be… until it’s not.

Electric vehicles were toys for the very wealthy, until prices started to come down and eventually we’ll all ride in them.

Smart phones were luxury items until we all had them. Uber was a luxury service until it became less expensive to rely on Uber than to own a car.

And I could go on and on and on. But thinking about cost and accessibility is a terrible way to embark on a new endeavor. Rather that’s the next pursuit of an endeavor once it’s reached maturity.

And so perhaps, one of our theses should be investing in toys for the rich, so that they may be made, and so they may earn profits that facilitate R&D to bring down the costs of those crazy, absurd, expensive things.

[5'9", ~170 lbs, male, New York, NY]. I blog about investing. And usually about things I’ve learned the hard way. Opinions are my own, not CoVenture’s

[5'9", ~170 lbs, male, New York, NY]. I blog about investing. And usually about things I’ve learned the hard way. Opinions are my own, not CoVenture’s